CHHI 301 B02 PAPER 1

Topics: New Testament, Jesus, Old Testament Pages: 10 (1837 words) Published: March 5, 2015
LIBERTY UNIVERSITY

THE FOUNDATION OF ORTHODOXY AND THE NEW TESTAMENT CANON

RESEARCH PAPER

SUBMITTED TO DR. NICKENS

IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT

OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE COMPLETION OF THE COURSE CHHI 301-B02 BY
AUDRA C. BALQUE

MANOR, TX 78653

FEBRUARY 6, 2014

The Foundation of Orthodoxy and the New Testament Canon
The foundation of orthodoxy and the New Testament Canon are connected to one another because they were used and based on scriptures and testimonies written by the Apostles. Christians believed the writings of the Apostles because in their minds there was no reason to question those authoritative writings since they had documented the time that they spent with Jesus and the instructions that he gave to each Apostle as well as giving them instructions on the church. Bruce Metzger, states that “The issues were whether the Rule of Faith determined the extent of the canon or was shaped by it and what constituted apostolicity and authority of Scripture.”(Metzger,1987:127). According to Metzger, “The New Testament book opens with a judicious and critical analysis of scholarly writings on the subject of the canon prior to and during the twentieth century.” (Metzger, 1987:127). The early church was dealing with many challenges internally and externally. There were movements that were within the church that questioned the orthodoxy and the New Testament canon. One of the movements included the Gnosticism, with its claim to esoteric knowledge that supplements and basically alters the outlook of the writers of the New Testament: the attempt by Marcion to sever the connection with Judaism by discarding the Old Testament and reducing the authoritative Christian writings to an expurgated edition of Luke and the letters of Paul; and Montanism, which claimed to supplement the New Testament by revelatory insights and discourses (Metzger, 1987:127). A major factor in the East was the canonical letter of Athanasius of Alexandria in 367, in which Athanasius listed the twenty-seven books of what is now regarded as the New Testament (Metzger, 1987:127). The New Testament Canon now serves as biblical roadmap for us as Christians to understand and believe the deity of Jesus Christ through the Word of God as well as God’s instructions for today’s church. Marcion

Marcion was known as a heretic and he totally rejected The Old Testament and other gospels because he felt and believed that they all had been tainted by the Jews (Baker, 2008:5). Baker stated that he decided to construct his own canon which included most of Paul’s letters in edited form, along with the Luke’s gospel (Baker, 2008:5). According to Baker, this list by Marcion is the first known listing of what is called a New Testament canon and it helped push the early church to develop an authoritative list of inspired writings (Baker, 2008:5). In Williams’s Reconsidering Marcion's Gospel Canon are the reasons as to why it caused problems. I have obtained twenty-three explicit correlated readings for Marcion's Gospel (Williams, 1989:481). 12 These readings are provided in the Appendix (Williams, 1989:481). William’s general findings are as follows:

First, our knowledge of the text of Marcion's Gospel is extremely limited. Of the total corpus of twenty-three readings, only readings 1-5 allow us to be reasonably sure of the wording of Marcion's Gospel, although at times the witnesses conflict about word order (Williams, 1989:481). In a few additional readings, the witnesses offer only minor variations. In the majority of cases, however, despite the fact that the witnesses agree about particular parts of a passage, they display major discrepancies in other parts of the reading (Williams, 1989:481). Second, Marcion's Gospel appears to have been based on a text that was similar to Luke, with three qualifying factors: it often reads with minority texts of Luke, especially "Western" witnesses; 13 it occasionally reads with...

Bibliography: The Biblical World , Vol. 28, No. 1 (Jul., 1906) , pp. 50-58
Published by: The University of Chicago Press
Journal of Biblical Literature , Vol. 108, No. 3 (Autumn, 1989) , pp. 477-496
Published by: The Society of Biblical Literature
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