role of youth in multiculturalism

Topics: Multiculturalism, Culture, Political science Pages: 4 (935 words) Published: November 27, 2013
role of youth in multiculturalism
1,000 - 1,500 word essay

Think of your essay in terms of three key points that are then slotted into eight paragraphs. Each paragraph, apart from the introduction and conclusion, should have approximately the same number of words. A good guide is to think of your essay in terms of three main points that will have 2 paragraphs each.

A 1,500 word essay structure could look like this:

Introduction

1 paragraph (150 words)

Point One

2 paragraphs (400 words)

Point Two

2 paragraphs (400 words) APPROXIMATELY

Point Three

2 paragraphs (400 words)

Conclusion

1 paragraph (200 words)

Multiculturalism relates to communities containing multiple cultures. The term is used in two broad ways, either descriptively or normatively.[1] As a descriptive term, it usually refers to the simple fact of cultural diversity: it is generally applied to the demographic make-up of a specific place, sometime at the organizational level, e.g. schools, businesses, neighborhoods, cities, or nations. As a normative term, it refers to ideologies or policies that promote this diversity or its institutionalization; in this sense, multiculturalism is a society “at ease with the rich tapestry of human life and the desire amongst people to express their own identity in the manner they see fit.”[2] Such ideologies or policies vary widely, including country to country,[3] ranging from the advocacy of equal respect to the various cultures in a society, to a policy of promoting the maintenance of cultural diversity, to policies in which people of various ethnic and religious groups are addressed by the authorities as defined by the group they belong to.[4][5] However, two main different and seemingly inconsistent strategies have developed through different Government policies and strategies:[6][7] The first focuses on interaction and communication between different cultures. Interactions of cultures provide...

References: 6 Further reading
7 External links
Multiculturalism in different countries[edit]
Multiculturalism centers on the thought in political philosophy about the way to respond to cultural and religious differences. It is closely associated with “identity politics,” “the politics of difference,” and “the politics of recognition.” It is also a matter of economic interests and political power. (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy). Despite the fact that multiculturalism has mainly been used as a term to define disadvantaged groups, including African Americans, women, gays and lesbians, and the disabled, many theorists tend to focus their arguments on immigrants who are ethnic and religious minorities, minority nations, and indigenous peoples.
Multiculturalism can refer to a demographic fact, a particular set of philosophical ideas, or a specific orientation by government or institutions toward a diverse population. Most of the debate over multiculturalism centers around whether or not public multiculturalism is the appropriate way to deal with diversity and immigrant integration. Recognition in the context of multicultural education is a demand not just for recognition of aspects of a group 's actual culture but also for the history of group subordination and its entire experience.
The term multiculturalism is most often used in reference to Western nation-states, which had seemingly achieved a de facto single national identity during the 18th and/or 19th centuries.[10] Multiculturalism has been official policy in several Western nations since the 1970s, for reasons that varied from country to country,[11][12][13] including the fact that many of the great cities of the Western world are increasingly made of a mosaic of cultures.[14]
The Canadian government has often been described as the instigator of multicultural ideology because of its public emphasis on the social importance of immigration.[15] The Canadian Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism is often referred to as the origins of modern political awareness of multiculturalism.[16] In the Western English-speaking countries, multiculturalism as an official national policy started in Canada in 1971, followed by Australia in 1973 where it is maintained today.[17][18] [19][20] It was quickly adopted as official policy by most member-states of the European Union. Recently, right-of-center governments in several European states—notably the Netherlands and Denmark— have reversed the national policy and returned to an official monoculturalism.[21] A similar reversal is the subject of debate in the United Kingdom, among others, due to evidence of incipient segregation and anxieties over "home-grown" terrorism.[22] Several heads-of-state have expressed doubts about the success of multicultural policies: The United Kingdom 's Prime Minister David Cameron, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Australia 's ex-prime minister John Howard, Spanish ex-prime minister Jose Maria Aznar and French ex-president Nicolas Sarkozy have voiced concerns about the effectiveness of their multicultural policies for integrating immigrants.[23][24]
Many nation-states in Africa, Asia, and the Americas are culturally diverse, and are 'multicultural ' in a descriptive sense. In some, communalism is a major political issue. The policies adopted by these states often have parallels with multicultural-ist policies in the Western world, but the historical background is different, and the goal may be a mono-cultural or mono-ethnic nation-building - for instance in the Malaysian government 's attempt to create a 'Malaysian race ' by 2020.[25]
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