The Road to Renewal (Romans 12:1-2)

Topics: New Testament, Christianity, Jesus Pages: 9 (2846 words) Published: October 24, 2013

Summary Statement:
The Road to Renewal (Romans 12:1-2)

Outline

I. I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God
II. Believers are commanded to offer to God is their “bodies.” III. A living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God IV. The renewal of the mind

Introduction
Romans 12:1–2 begins the final section of the letter. Paul shifts his focus from instruction to exhortation, from what we might call indicative what God has done for us to the imperative what we are to do in response.* Douglas J. Moo explains, “If weakest heart the truth of the gospel that ( apostle) has presented, we will have a transformed worldview that cannot but affect our lives in uncounted ways. Paul has made this clear already in chapter 6, where he shows how our union with Christ in his death and resurrection leads to our ‘walking in newness of life’.** Now in this final section, Paul urges Christians to manifest the power of the gospel in specific areas of day-to-day life. Those who embrace the gospel, who are united to Christ, are rescued from the devastating effects of sin. Believers are justified, declared righteous in God’s sight, and thus have a secure hope for salvation from the wrath to come. They have been delivered from the penalty of sin and are no longer under condemnation (5:1). But, as Romans chapter 6 makes clear, all those who have been delivered from the penalty of sin has just as certainly been delivered from its dominion. Union with Christ in his death and resurrection provides for both justification and sanctification. Paul’s commission as an apostle was to “call people from among all the Gentiles to the obedience that comes from faith” Paul begins with an exhortation: “I urge you, brethren.” It is agreed that the verb translated “urge” (παρακαλέω) in the context of our passage has a meaning somewhere between “request” and “command,” between a mere beseeching or urging and a more authoritative exhortation.*** Most believe that Paul’s emphasis lies closer to exhortation. Douglas J. Moo argues the verb “has all the urgency and earnestness that it has when it is used in the sense beseech , but also ___________________________

* “The Disjunction Between Justification and Sanctification in Contemporary Evangelical Theology,” Detroit Baptist Seminary Journal 6 (Fall 2001): 17–44. ** Douglas J. Moo, The Epistle to the Romans, New International Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1996), p. 744 *** Douglas J. Moo, The Epistle to the Romans, New International Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1996), pp. 748–49. something more the note of authority.

I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God
People to whom the Apostle appeals, called brethren in” KJV translation”, and in the conscious choice of the word it is no doubt. All of Paul's argument in the previous chapters clearly reflects the tensions between Jew and Gentile in what was then the Roman Church; chapters 9-11 are devoted to the analysis of the role of Israel and other nations in the realization of the historic plan of God. Paul will return to this issue in Chapters 14 - 15, while the differences between natural and planted an olive tree branches fade into the background. All believers, regardless of their ethnicity - brothers and sisters in one international family of God, and therefore all have the same mission - to be holy, dedicated, humble, loving and conscious people belonging to God. Second, an important factor is the presence in the first verse of the words and phrases so the mercies...

Bibliography: “The Disjunction Between Justification and Sanctification in Contemporary Evangelical Theology,” Detroit Baptist Seminary Journal 6 (Fall 2001):
Moo, Douglas J. “The Epistles to the Romans.” The New International Commentary on
the New Testament. Edited by Gordon D. Fee. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1996.
Calvin, John. Commentaries on the epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Romans Grand Rapids: MI: Christian Classics Ethereal Library
Haldane, Robert. Commentary on Romans reprint of 1853 ed.; Grand Rapids: Kregel,1988
Murray, John. The Epistle to the Romans, 2 vols. in one, New International Commentary on the New Testament Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1959, 1965
Wallace, Daniel B. Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1996
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