Theology of Missions

Topics: New Testament, Jesus, Christianity Pages: 8 (2545 words) Published: July 16, 2013
Liberty University

The Biblical Theology of Missions

A research paper submitted to Dr. Neal Creecy

in partial fulfillment of the requirements for

the course GLST 500

Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary

By

Chris Hayes

Lynchburg, Virginia

April 7, 2013

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION.…………………………………………………………………................. 3 MISSIONS IN THE OLD TESTAMENT……………………………………...…………..… 3 MISSIONS IN THE NEW TESTAMENT…….…………………..….………......………...... 4 MISSIONS AND THE NATURE OF GOD………………………………..……………….. 6 MISSION THEOLOGY’S RELATION TO OTHER ASPECTS OF THEOLOGY……….. 6

SOTERIOLOGY…………………………………………………………………….. 6
ECCLESIOLOGY…………………………………………………………………… 7 KEY MOTIFS OF MISSION THEOLOGY.……………………...………………………… 8
JESUS……………………………………………………………………………….. 8
THE KINGDOM OF GOD…...……….……………………………………………. 8 CONCLUSION………………………………………………………………………………. 9 BIBLIOGRAPHY…………………………………………………………………………….. 11

INTRODUCTION
Throughout Scripture, there is abundant evidence of missions and the Lord carrying out His work and purpose for humanity, from Genesis to Revelation. God is always seeking out opportunities to advance His Kingdom and to make His name more famous throughout all nations and among all people. While He isn’t in any way reliant on man to achieve His goals and purposes, He longs to see His children be obedient to His calling on all who have believed. With that said, missions is not the primary purpose for Christians. Worship is. The Westminster Shorter Catechism gives us the primary purpose for humanity by saying, “The chief end of man is to glorify God and enjoy Him forever.”[1] Because there is a large number of humans who have yet to hear and believe the gospel, then the need for missions remains. Missions is not optional for believers according to the Scripture, but it is a mandate to the church to spread the good news of the gospel of Christ to all nations, cultures, and peoples. John Piper provides a simple, yet poignant quote on this topic: “Missions exists because worship doesn’t.”[2] Missions is a Biblically based function of the church and God’s work on earth cannot be done and Jesus cannot return until all have heard the gospel. Therefore, it is important to not only understand what missions is, but also gain a better understanding of the Biblical theology behind it. This study seeks to accomplish that by exploring Old and New Testament texts on missions, how missions relates to the nature of God, how missions relates to other aspects of theology and finally some key themes of mission theology. MISSIONS IN THE OLD TESTAMENT

The story of Abraham stands out in the Old Testament as one of the primary examples of the mission of God and the missions of His people. “Now the Lord said to Abram, “Go from your country and your kindred and your father's house to the land that I will show you. And I will make of you a great nation, and I will bless you and make your name great, so that you will be a blessing.””[3] Abraham had been called to leave his homeland and to go to a place that God would not disclose to him at the time, however, at the promise of a later revelation, Abraham gathered his family and all of his possessions and obediently followed. God informed him that this call compels him to leave his kindred and his land, but Abraham immediately obeyed the Lord and left, never to return again. Abraham’s faith led him to leave his country to go to another country that was spatially different, spiritually different, and sociologically different. While the Lord promises to bless Abraham, it’s even more important to note that God planned to bless everyone through Abraham.[4]

Another obvious example of missions in the Old Testament, and one of the most well known is the story of Jonah. Without any doubt, Jonah is called to take
a message from Yahweh to Israel’s most bitter and cruelest of...

Bibliography: Kuck, David W. ³Preaching on Acts for Mission Formation, Currents in Theology and Mission
31:1 (February 2004): 32.
Moreau, Scott A., Corwin, Gary R., and McGee, Gary B. Introducing World Mission: A Biblical,
Historical, and Practical Survey, (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2004), 31.
Piper, John. Let The Nations Be Glad! The Supremacy of God in Missions, 3rd ed. (Grand
Rapids; Baker Academic, 2009), 15.
Mission Board, 2006, 24.
Williamson, G.I. The Westminster Shorter Catechism. (Phillipsburg, NJ: P&R Publishing
Company, 1970), 1.
[2] John Piper, Let The Nations Be Glad! The Supremacy of God in Missions, 3rd ed. (Grand Rapids; Baker Academic, 2009), 15.
[4] Scott A. Moreau, Gary R. Corwin, and Gary B. McGee, Introducing World Mission: A Biblical, Historical, and Practical Survey, (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2004), 31.
Mission Board, 2006, 24.
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