A Imprecatory Prayers

Topics: David, Old Testament, New Testament Pages: 11 (2602 words) Published: March 4, 2015

LIBERTY UNIVERSITY

SHOULD CHRISTIANS PRAY THE IMPRECATORY PSALMS

A RESEARCH PAPER SUBMITTED TO DR.
IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENT FOR
THE COURSE OBST 592

LIBERTY BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

BY
THERESA NICHOLOSON

TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION…………………………………………………………………………….3 IMPRECATORY PSALMS………………………………………………………………...3 CHALLENGING OF THE OLD TESTATMENT..……………………………………….4 PSALMS OF IMPRECATIONS…………………………………………………………….5 PSALM 55…………………………………………………………………………………..6 Cast Your Burden on the Lord…………………………………………………………….6 PSALM 59…………………………………………………………………………………..6 Deliver Me from Enemies…………………………………………………………………6 PSALM 109…………………………………………………………………………………7 Curse Against a Personal Enemy…………………………………………………………..7 INCONSISTENCIES OF OLD TESTAMENT…………………………………………….8 THERAPEUTIC IMPLICATIONS…………………………………………………………9 Therapy for Christians………………………………………………………………………9 CONCLUSION………………………………………………………………………………..9 BIBLIOGRAPHY…………………………………………………………………………….11

Introduction
Imprecatory psalms are prayer melodies labeled due to their precise spirited attitude towards the enemy. In the Old Testament, we find the concept of a curse given very often. The most composite curses are seen throughout the Book of Psalms, where they are considered imprecatory prayers. What does imprecatory mean? The verb imprecate stands for “praying evil against” or “to invoke curse upon another”, henceforth the name for these prayers. These scriptures tend to create numerous concerns amongst preachers and the congregation. Dominant to the issue is the obvious incitation of God’s vengeance and anger to fall upon his enemies. These Psalms prompt hatred, an honorable and upright dilemma, for many Christians disciplined in the Law of Christ. The anger and rage depicted in the Imprecatory Psalms are an integral part of every human being since the fall of Adam. This weighed against the New Testament teaching of “bless and do not curse”1 and “love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you,”2 cause many Christians to beseech that the Church should not pray the imprecations today. Utilizing imprecatory prayers for our situations today is unjustifiable, as it would entail taking these prayers out of perspective. God wants us to pray for their salvations first, and then he will take the situation into his own will. Imprecatory Psalms

Does prayer play a crucial role in our lives today? Several would likely say no, whereas most others would agree that prayer is vital, but, the straightforward truth of the matter is that for many years, prayer at school has been inspired by each society and government. In recent years, it has been established that prayer in educational settings has led to a gradual ethical decline. Our government was based mostly upon spiritual beliefs from the very start. The Declaration of Independence says: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by God with certain unalienable rights. . ." Surely, it debates whether God, creations, God-given moral rights, the providence of God, and the final Day of Judgment-all of our spiritual traditions.  The imprecatory language contained in the Psalter implies calling down divine judgment on an enemy of the psalmist and ultimately an enemy of God. “Crucial to the definition of an imprecation is that it (i) must be an invocation – a prayer or address to God, and (ii) must contain a request that one’s enemies or the enemies of Yahweh be judged and justly punished.” Finding cases of imprecation in the Psalms is somewhat informal, as it seems in eighteen psalms, but that does not create its classification as an Imprecatory Psalm. “An imprecatory psalm, then, is one in which the imprecation is a main element or leading feature of the psalm.”3 Beliefs vary as to the character of the Psalms that support this definition, since there are nearly one hundred verses of...

Bibliography: Baylis, Albert H., and Albert H. Baylis. From Creation to the Cross: Understanding the First Half of the Bible. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Zondervan, 1996.
Byers, Andrew J. Faith without Illusions: Following Jesus as a Cynic-saint. Downers Grove, Ill.: IVP Books, 2011.
Day, John N. “The Imprecatory Psalms and Christian Ethics.” Bibliotheca Sacra 156 (April-June 2002): 166-86.
Estes, Daniel J. Handbook on the Wisdom Books and Psalms. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker Academic, 2005.
Hankle, Dominick D. “The Therapeutic Implication of the Imprecatory Psalms in the Christian Counseling Setting.” Journal of Psychology and Theology 38, no. 4 (2010):275-80.
Luc, Alex. “Interpretreting the Curses in the Psalms.” Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society 42, no. 3 (September 1999): 395-410.
Merrill, Eugene H., and Mark F. Rooker. The World and the Word: An Introduction to the Old Testament. Nashville, Tenn.: B&H Academic, 2011.
Nehrbass, Daniel Michael. Praying Curses: The Therapeutic and Preaching Value of the Imprecatory Psalms. Eugene: Pickwick Publications, 2013.
Shows, Wallace B. The Revelation of Jesus Christ: A Comprehensive Study of the Book of Revelation. Phoenix: Xulon Press, 2004.
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